Last edited by Dataur
Thursday, July 30, 2020 | History

3 edition of manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula found in the catalog.

manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula

John Dransfield

manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula

by John Dransfield

  • 88 Want to read
  • 7 Currently reading

Published by Forest Dept., Ministry of Primary Industries, Malaysia in [Kuala Lumpur] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Malay Peninsula.
    • Subjects:
    • Rattan palms -- Malay Peninsula.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementJohn Dransfield.
      SeriesMalayan forest records ;, no. 29
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsQK495.P17 D69
      The Physical Object
      Pagination270 p. :
      Number of Pages270
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL4252686M
      LC Control Number80942443

      The portion of the Malay Peninsula where the Thai Buddhist civilization of Thailand gives way to the Malay Muslim civilization of Malaysia is characterized by multiple forms of pluralism. An appreciation of the long history and varied forms of that pluralism opens up fresh and important perspectives on the violent crisis currently affecting southern Thailand. Thai South and Malay North brings.   European knowledge of the Malay Peninsula is confirmed in Ptolemy’s book Geographia. It is likely that Romans visited the region during trading expeditions to India and China. Langasuka, one of the first Hindu-Malay kingdoms, is established around the area known as Kedah. It lasts in one form or another until the 15th century.

      Malays (Malay: Orang Melayu, Jawi: أورڠ ملايو) are an Austronesian ethnic group and nation native to the Malay Peninsula, eastern Sumatra of Indonesia and coastal Borneo, as well as the smaller islands which lie between these locations — areas that are collectively known as the Malay locations are today part of the nations of Malaysia (Malay nation state), Brunei. vii CONTENTS Acknowledgments ix Preface x Abbreviations xiii Maps xv 1 Malaysia as history 1 2 Peopling Malaysia 13 3 Networks of power and exchange 33 4 Melaka: a traditional Malay kingdom 58 5 Johor and Kedah: contracts and alliances 78 6 Pressures for change 95 7 Responses to colonialism 8 Transition to Independence 9 Malaysia is born 10 Developing new visions

      COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus. Books Biology of Polyrhachis schellerichae, a specialized bamboo-dwelling ant species from the Malay Peninsula (Insecta: Hymenoptera: Formicidae).


Share this book
You might also like
Wine dark sea

Wine dark sea

Jean Crotti.

Jean Crotti.

Soil mechanics for road engineers.

Soil mechanics for road engineers.

Elijah the Fishbite

Elijah the Fishbite

Delhi sands flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus adbominalis)

Delhi sands flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus adbominalis)

Documents and articles about Métis people.

Documents and articles about Métis people.

essay on the duty of divine praise and thanksgiving

essay on the duty of divine praise and thanksgiving

And one to grow on

And one to grow on

conversational control program for Argus 400 and two other programs..

conversational control program for Argus 400 and two other programs..

Adhesives

Adhesives

Statistics of Ireland.

Statistics of Ireland.

treatise of maritim surveying, in two parts, with a prefatory essay on draughts and surveys

treatise of maritim surveying, in two parts, with a prefatory essay on draughts and surveys

Manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula by John Dransfield Download PDF EPUB FB2

A Manual of the Rattans of the Malay Peninsula Issue 29 of Malayan forest records: Publisher: Forest Department, Ministry of Primary Industries, Malaysia, Original from: University of Minnesota: Digitized: Length: pages: Export Citation: BiBTeX EndNote RefMan. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Dransfield, John.

Manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula. [Kuala Lumpur]: Forest Dept., Ministry of Primary Industries, Malaysia, ©A manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula / John Dransfield Forest Dept., Ministry of Primary Industries, Malaysia [Kuala Lumpur] Wikipedia Citation Please see Wikipedia's template documentation for further citation fields that may be required.

Rattan (from the Malay rotan) is the name for roughly species of old world climbing palms belonging to subfamily Calamoideae. Rattan is also known as manila, or malacca, named after the ports of shipment Manila and Malacca City, and as manau (from the Malay rotan manau, the trade name for Calamus manan canes in Southeast Asia).

The climbing habit is associated with the characteristics. International Bamboo and Rattan Organisation. Home; About Us.

About INBAR; Member States; Why Bamboo & Rattan. Governance; Working at INBAR; Contact Us; Our Work. Global Assessment of Bamboo and Rattan The bamboos of the Malay Peninsula: Books: Author: R.

E Holttum. Language: English. Pages: INBAR on Social Media. Home; About Us. About. A manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula.

By John Dransfield. Forest Dept., Ministry of Primary Industries, Malaysia, The rattans of Sabah. By John Dransfield. Forest Dept. Sabah, Palmae. By John Dransfield. Published on behalf of the East African Governments by Balkema, John Dransfield, A Manual of the Rattans of the Malay Peninsula, Malayan Forest Records no.

29; Forest Department, West Malaysia, ; pp. Price: Malaysian $ Rattans, those spiny climbing palms which are found throughout the forests of the Malay Peninsula, have been used by man for ages for the construction. A manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula.

Kuala Lumpur: Forest Department. Dransfield, J. The biology of Asiatic rattans in relation to the rattan trade and conservation. In H. Synge, ed. The biological aspects of rare plant conservation, pp.

London, John Wiley. Dransfield, J. The rattans of Sabah. Sabah Forest Record. Journals & Books; Help Alternative zu echtem Holz Holz-Zentralblatt Nr () Dransfield, a J.

Dransfield, A manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula Malayan Forest Records No. 29, Forest Dep., Ministry of Primary Industries Malaysia. () Dransfield, b J. Dransfield, A monograph of the genus Ceratolobus (Palmae).

A Manual of the Rattans of the Malay Peninsula. Malayan Forest Record No. 29, Forest Dept., Ministry of Primary Industries, Malaysia. Google Scholar IDRC. Rattan: a report of a workshop held in Singapore, June International Development Research.

Dransfield, A Manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula. Malayan Forest Recirds ; Sort Newest first; Oldest first; Alphabetically; Sources. Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families Book December ().

A manual to the rattans of the Malay Peninsula. Malaysia: Forest Department, Ministry. of Primary Industries. Drans eld J. The rattans of Sabah.

A manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula / John Dransfield Michael Dransfield: a retrospective / selected by John Kinsella Elspeth Pender Dransfield speaks of her son Michael John Pender Dransfield in the Hazel de Berg collecti.

A Manual of the Rattans of the Malay Peninsula. Malay-sian Forest Records No. Forest Department, Kuala Lumpur. Dransfield, J. The Rattans of Sabah. Sabah Forest Record No. Forest Department, Sabah. Philippine Rattans. Title: text ().pub. I was educated at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, and gained my PhD under Professor E.J.H.

Corner in with a study of two Malaysian palm genera, Eugeissona and Johannesteijsmannia.I went on to devote my working life to palm research, working first in Indonesia for four years on palms specializing in the rattans, the climbing palms that are the source of cane for cane-furniture.

context, the description of each genus is partly copied from ‘A Manual of the Rattans of the Malay Peninsular’ (Dransfield, J., ). Furthermore, many materials lack inflorescences and fruits. Hence some information on flowers and fruits is copied from the Rattans of Lao PDR, Flore.

Rattans, spiny climbing palms with some species, are strictly Old World in origin. Its distribution is limited to tropical and subtropical Asia, where ten of the l3 known genera are endemic to equatorial Africa. True rattans are not known in Latin America. The greatest diversity is in the Malay Peninsula.

Dransfield, J.,A Manual of rattans of the Malay Peninsula, Malayan Forest Record No, Forest Department, Ministry of Primary Industries Malaysia. The future prospect of rattan as food resources in Central Kalimantan, 6 th ICGRC Proceeding Book, ISBN: X.

context, the description of each genus is partly copied from 'A Manual of the Rattans of the Malay Peninsular' (Dransfield, J., ). Furthermore, many materials lack inflorescences and fruits.

Hence some information on flowers and fruits is copied from the Rattans of Lao PDR, Flore. We hope that DNA markers specific to sexes in rattan manau could be identified. These DNA markers will be subjected to testing on male and female plants before fully implemented.

References Dransfield, J. A manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula. Malayan. Solitary high climbing rattan with stems ultimately to 60 m or more in length, without sheaths about cm near the base, and about cm in the upper part of the mature plant, with sheaths to about cm in diameter; upper internodes about 12 cm in length, lower internodes to 30 cm.

Sheaths, when newly emerged rich reddish-brown quickly. The material was sterile and it is still not certain where its affinities lie. (J. Dransfield, A Manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula. Malayan Forest Records )/Palmweb.

Culture Comments and Curiosities. Uses: Apparently a good cane but too rare to be of significance. (J. Dransfield, A Manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula. Dransfield, A Manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula.

Malayan Forest Records ) This species is the smallest known in the genus. It is most closely related to C. cockburnii but can be distinguished by the much finer leaflets, densely bristly on lower surface, and the fruit with 16 rather than 12 vertical rows of scales.

It is.